Wishaw great-gran turns to cannabis extract oil to cure Parkinson’s pain

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A Wishaw woman who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s has had her life transformed by using a controversial food supplement extracted from cannabis plants.

May Dobbin, 71, of Netherton – who has limited mobility and experiences tremors – has suffered from insomnia and mood swings since her diagnosis.

Her daughter, Tracy Bryce, says May was waking every hour during the night, was shaking so much that she couldn’t hold a cup and was very emotional.

When hairdresser Tracy’s colleague told her how cannabidiol (CBD) eases her daughter’s medical symptoms, she decided six months ago to ask May to give it a try.

The great-gran began putting four or five drops of the oil under her tongue two or three times a day, sipping the product’s daytime tea and having a CBD night-time brew before bed.

Now, Tracy says her mum – who has nine grandchildren and three great grandchildren – doesn’t shake as much, has increased muscle movement in her arms and legs, is less emotional and sleeps soundly.

“My mum was willing to give anything a go if there was a chance it might help,” said Tracy, of Morningside. “It really has made a difference to her quality of life.

“The difference in her in the last few months has been unbelieveable.

“She takes the drops under her tongue and within 15 minutes she is calmer. Even her mood is better. My dad, Len, can’t believe the difference.”

Tracy learned about Hope cannabidiol from Stephanie Hill, whose mum runs Michelle’s hair and beauty salon in Wishaw’s Main Street.

Stephanie, of Wishaw, has achalasia – a rare disorder of the esophagus, or food pipe, which makes it difficult to swallow food and drink.

She began taking the oil, brought to the market by Lanakshire business Hope, to ease associated spasms and make her feel more relaxed.

CBD is said to hold the key to the wide variety of medicinal and therapeutic effects marijuana offers, all with zero toxicity to humans. It is derived from the part of the cannabis plant that doesn’t get users high.

It has such a positive effect on Stephanie, that her mum, Michelle Hill, offered to stock and sell it in her Main Street salon.

A number of her regular clients who have aliments including Alzheimers, joint pain, anxiety and depression have given it a try – and many now use it regularly. Prices range from £9.99 to £29.99.

“It has helped me massively and I am a big advocate of it,” continued Stephanie, of Wishaw, who says the product is 100 per cent natural and not addictive.

“Introducing it for sale in Wishaw and making it available to the people of Wishaw is, I think, a progressive thing to do.”

Tracy agrees and wants information about the food supplement to be more widely available.

“It may raise an eyebrow but there really is nothing to fear,” insists Tracy.

Although it seems to have helped relieve May’s symptoms, Tracy accepts that CBD isn’t for everyone.

Since 2016, CBD has been classed as a medicine in the UK and there have been a few cases where it has been prescribed on the NHS. There is also some limited use of CBD on the NHS to treat MS.

The government still describes cannabis as a ‘harmful drug’ and this stance seems to have set it against the use of anything associated with cannabis, even compounds like CBD with no psychoactive effects.

CBD is legal to buy in the UK, but legal restrictions mean it is sold as a food supplement, rather than a medicine.

May Dobbin with daughter Tracy

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